Posts Tagged ‘Jon Bernthal’

With any luck, I’ll have the Top 10 completed by mid-January. “The Post” hits Salt Lake City on the 12th and, let’s be honest, I’m going to love it. How *much* I love it remains to be seen, but I can hardly put a list together without seeing the latest Spielberg film.

One thing I’ve already noticed from my shortlist is that 2017 did a great job of spreading the love throughout the year. Instead of the usual November-December cluster of quality, this year’s shortlist includes several early-summer releases and at least one that premiered back in February (hint, hint).

The popcorn fare was also better than usual. I already wrote in my honorable mentions how we got five legitimately great superhero flicks this year. Add to that a risky (read: polarizing) entry into the Star Wars franchise, another you’re-lying-if-you-say-you-didn’t-like-it Fast and Furious film, and a remake of “It” that, IMHO, outdoes the original.

But when looking back at the slate of mainstream, pair-it-with-a-coke, studio fare, there was one film that stood out for it’s thrills and chills. While not the best movie of the year, in an academic sense, it was definitely the most fun I had at the movies and that’s why this year’s Number 11 film is:

Baby Driver

Click on that embedded video, right now. Even if you’ve already seen the movie and especially if you haven’t, do yourself a favor and watch that clip, which is the 6-minute bank heist and car chase that cold opens Edgar Wright’s fantastic movie.

Wright, director of similar genre-blending pop culture staples like Shaun of The Dead and Scott Pilgrim vs. the World puts his signature editing style to its maximum effect in Baby Driver. The film stars Ansel Elgort as Baby, a getaway criminal with tinnitus who relies on a steady soundtrack of music to drown out the ringing in his ears and who is forced to take less-than-legal jobs to pay down a debt. He meets a girl near the end of his indentured servitude, setting up the kind of “one last job” scenario familiar to heist movies, but deployed in a way that marries sound, sight and action choreography in a way that only Wright can.

The chase scenes are, quite simply, unparalleled and matched with a dynamite soundtrack and joyful performances by a crew of A-list actors (including Jon Hamm, Jon Bernthal and Jamie Foxx) playing both into and against their stereotypes.

The one sour note, cosmic in nature, is the inclusion of Kevin Spacey as Baby’s puppet master. It’s a supporting role in the film’s goings-on, but nonetheless harder to stomach now that Spacey’s decades of predatory behavior off-screen has come to light. Perhaps future releases will swap Spacey out, George Lucas style, and I suppose some consolation can be found in that fact that [Spoiler Alert] Spacey’s character need not return for the sequel. I defer to everyone their own calculus on whether or not to watch films that feature terrible people, but for me, the talent and effort of the many other individuals involved in Baby Driver deserve to be celebrated.

Read Full Post »

maxresdefault.jpg

Ben Affleck’s new movie, “The Accountant,” is all over the map. Ostensibly, it’s about a math savant with high-functioning autism who earns his keep as a black market book keeper for mega-corporations, drug cartels and terrorists.

But it’s also a family drama about a gifted child raised under the stern gaze of a militaristic father, which molds the boy into a killing machine.

But it’s also a romance, with a social misfit rushing to save the nerdy damsel in distress, played by perfect human Anna Kendrick.

It’s also a pseudo-superhero movie, with a hyper-intelligent one-man-wrecking-machine doling out vigilante justice with the help of J.K. Simmons, in a striking parallel to his upcoming role as Commissioner Gordon in the Justice League movie.

It’s also a revenge flick.

In truth, the disparate elements don’t combine into a coherent hole. The tone is wildly inconsistent, trading blase mayhem with awe-shucks humor and quiet introspection. With Affleck at its center, it feels like Good Will Hunting, Daredevil and Argo crammed into a single stew.

But that stew is not abjectly terrible. Director Gavin O’Connor (Warrior) and writer Bill Dubuque (The Judge) clearly set out to make a thinking man’s action film, and to a large extent they succeed. Accountant, with its seemingly emotionless protagonist and no-frills choreography, makes for a unique storytelling format that leans into and twist the tropes of the genre.

Were it not for a few too many unreasonably contrived plot coincidences, the movie would be a valid, albeit not superfluous, success. That the film’s major reveal is so glaringly apparent can’t lessen the dull thud that it lands with, and the film’s action sequences escalate nicely before culminating in a final standoff that is shot in near-darkness, making it nearly incomprehensible. And a B-plot focusing on an up-and-coming Treasury investigator feels completely tacked on as an afterthought, and that’s before an exposition dump at the start of Act II renders the whole sequence largely moot.

There’s enough happening onscreen to keep an audience engaged — though the film runs a little long at 128 minutes —  and the John Wick-esque shoot ’em up style is one that I’m happy to see more film’s embracing. But for all the film’s assets, it can’t quite keep them organized to offset depreciation.

Grade: B-

*The Accountant opens nationwide on Friday, October 14

Read Full Post »